Ching Tang: The science of organic light-emitting diodes

Professor Ching Tang

Ching Tang: The science of organic light-emitting diodes

Professor Ching Tang’s pioneering work led to the practical use of organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) and their widespread application in displays and lighting – from smartphones to TVs. He arrived at this achievement through studying light emission processes in electrically driven organic materials and invented a new device structure in which two carefully selected materials were stacked, allowing for high-efficiency light emission at low drive voltages.

Professor Tang is the current Kyoto Prize Laureate for Advanced Technology. As part of the Kyoto Prize at Oxford 2021, he will deliver a lecture examining the evolution and future prospects of OLEDs, followed by opportunities for Q&A.

Please note: This event takes place online via Zoom. Register below to receive joining instructions. A recording of the lecture and Q&A will be available to watch afterwards on the Blavatnik School of Government YouTube channel.

 

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If you have any questions about the event please email: kyoto@bsg.ox.ac.uk.

Preview

Panel discussion

A panel discussion featuring the 2019 Laureates also takes place as part of this year’s Kyoto Prize at Oxford – find out more and register.

About the Kyoto Prize

The Kyoto Prize is an international award, organised by the Inamori Foundation, to honour those who have contributed significantly to the scientific, cultural, and spiritual betterment of humankind. Each year the prize is awarded in three categories: Advanced Technology, Basic Sciences, and Arts and Philosophy. The awards are held annually in November, in Kyoto, Japan. The Laureates travel to Oxford in the following May for the Kyoto Prize at Oxford hosted by the Blavatnik School of Government at the University of Oxford. Due to the postponement of last year's event in response to the COVID-19 pandemic, this year the Blavatnik School is hosting the 2019 Laureates.

The driving vision for the Kyoto Prize at Oxford is that the Inamori Foundation and the Blavatnik School of Government find a shared purpose in inspiring, educating and connecting individuals who strive for the greater good of humankind and society.